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SHOTOKAN KARATE DO

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Supreme Master Gichin Funakoshi

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We associate ourselves with Shotokan and its practices because it is the philosophy and technique that Gichin Funakoshi developed and because he is directly responsible for creating our organization. Master Funakoshi is a very important person in karate history because he is credited with formally introducing the art to Japan. The existence karate was already well known to the Japanese for many years by this time, but was an illegal activity until 1902. During the first part of the twentieth century, Master Funakoshi was invited to Japan several times, from his home in Okinawa. He was chosen for this honor because of his outstanding reputation as an expert in the art and his professionalism as a teacher.

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These were very formal invitations to demonstrate karate in physical education exhibitions sponsored by the Japanese government. The exhibitions were so successful that he was eventually asked to give a special performance for the emperor and the royal family.

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Master Funakoshi’s performances also drew the attention of Jigoro Kano, the founder of Judo. Master Kano appealed to Master Funakoshi to stay on in Japan and teach karate to the Japanese people. Master Funakoshi eventually did so and opened the first dojo in Tokyo around 1936. He accumulated many students that began to refer to their karate training as shotokan which was meant to honor Master Funakoshi because shoto was his pen-name and kan refers to the dojo hall. After WWII, these students organized the Japan Karate Association with Master Funakoshi as Supreme Master.

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            Master Masatoshi Nakayama

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Master Masatoshi Nakayama was the most prominent student Master Funakoshi had and was his closest assistant and instructor. Master Funakoshi eventually gave permission to Master Nakayama allowing members of the Allied Occupation Forces to watch and even attend karate training. This was the first step towards the spread of true Shotokan Karate around the world. After Master Funakoshi’s death in 1957 he became the 2nd Chief Instructor of the Japan Karate Association.

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            Grand Master Teruyuki Okazaki

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Eventually around 1961, Master Nakayama asked the head of the JKA Instructor Trainee Program, Teruyuki Okazaki, to come to the United States and spread the practice of Shotokan Karate. Master Okazaki stayed in the US, and found the International Shotokan Karate Association in 1977 and remains its Chairman and Chief Instructor. Master Nakayama also sent Master Yutaka Yaguchi 1965 to help with this effort. Master Yaguchi is now the Vice-Chief Instructor of the ISKF and was a mentor to Sensei Greer Golden.

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Sensei Greer Golden, Chief Instructor, Emeritus

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Sensei Golden is the Chief Instructor of Mid-America ISKF. In 1957, Mr. Golden was on active duty in the Air Force, stationed in Japan. During this time he began training and actually extended his military enlistment for an additional year so he could continue to train in Japan and test for his Shodan, which he received in 1961. After achieving his Shodan, Sensei Golden returned to the United States where he had the fortune to train under Master Yaguchi. In an attempt to further develop karate in America, in 1968 the JKA held its first Instructor Trainee program in the United States. Sensei Golden attended this program full-time, and graduated in 1969. This was the first instructor class to graduate outside of Japan. He was then sent to Athens, Ohio (Ohio University) to begin teaching karate. While in Athens, Sensei Golden began making the trip to Philadelphia to train with Master Okazaki. When the ISKF was formed in 1977 Sensei Golden was appointed the Chief Instructor of the Mid-America Karate Region.

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Sensei Martin Vaughan, Chief Instructor, Regional Director

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Sensei Vaughan began training in 1972 with Mr. Golden at the Ohio Univ. karate club. He made shodan in 1974 and nidan in 1977. He was a member of the team, president of the club and an assistant to Mr. Golden during his time there. Also, during this time Sensei Vaughan was a member of the 1st place national collegiate kata team (finishing 2nd by 0.1 to the 1st place team in the national tournament). This team then went on to represent the U.S. (and win 1st place) at the Pan American tournament held at the Olympic Velodrome in Montreal, Canada in 1978. In 1976 Sensei Vaughan placed 2nd in individual kata at the International Goodwill tournament at Master camp. Many times he represented the Mid America region at the National tournament in kata and kumite.

 

In 1985 Sensei Vaughan moved to Mississippi and trained with Jerry Kattarwar, Sr. and Mr. Mikami. He placed several times at local and regional competitions and represented the Southern region on several occasions.

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In 1988 Sensei Vaughan moved to Rochester, NY and eventually began teaching at the ISKF club at the Univ. of Rochester. While at Rochester he trained many shodans and nidans and regional level competitors. In 1990 he joined the instructor trainee program of the ISKF/JKA and was certified as a "D" level judge. In the next years Sensei Vaughan was advanced to "C" and "B" level (at the time "B" was the highest , non-Japanese, level and the entry to international tournaments).  Sensei Vaughan is currently an "A" level Judge.  In 1996 he received his "D" instructor certification and in 1997, received his "D" examiner certification, and was promoted to grade “C” instructor and examiner at Master Camp in 2007. He is currently an "A" level instructor and a "B" level examiner.  Sensei Vaughan made sandan in 1990, yondan in 1994, and godan in 1999. Sensei Vaughan passed the rokudan dan exam at Nationals in Alaska (2006) and his shichidan at Nationals in Scottsdale, AZ. (2012). All of his dan rankings were taken with Mr. Okazaki (godan, rokudan, and shichidan were by the national examining board).

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Sensei Vaughan has served as a judge at many national tournaments, and he has judged internationally at many Shoto World Cups and Pan American Tournaments. He was also the assistant coach to the ISKF junior team at the 2004 Shoto World Cup held near Tokyo Japan.

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He credits Mr. Golden with beginning to teach him how to become an effective instructor and Mr. Okazaki with finishing what Mr. Golden started. Mr. Mikami didn't influence how he teaches as much as he influenced what he taught. He feels very fortunate to had direct contact with these three great karate instructors.

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Sensei Vaughan has a Ph.D. in Life Sciences/Physiology, was a research scientist with the USDA, Associate Professor of biological sciences at Rochester Institute of Technology and currently a Lecturer in Biology at Indiana Univ. Purdue Univ. Indianapolis. He is an Advanced Physical Fitness Specialist certified by the Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research. He has taught and done research in sport science and physiology.

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Sensei Vaughan moved back to Mid America in 1999 where he started the Indiana ISKF club in Indianapolis.